'No to terrorists': Policeman shot dead by ISIS gunman on Champs-Elysees was a gay rights champion in final weeks of his job who made a defiant rallying call as the Bataclan ...

  • Xavier Jugelé, 37, has been named as the policeman shot dead in Paris last night
  • He was killed by ISIS gunman - identified as Karim Cheurfi - on Champs-Elysees
  • Jugele was on duty at the reopening of the Bataclan hall in November last year
  • He defiantly said 'no to terrorists' a year after Paris attacks that killed 130 people 

The policeman killed by an ISIS gunman on the Champs-Elysees has been named on social media as 37-year-old Xavier Jugelé

The policeman killed by an ISIS gunman on the Champs-Elysees has been named on social media as 37-year-old Xavier Jugelé

The policeman killed by an ISIS gunman on the Champs-Elysees was today named as Xavier Jugelé, a 37-year-old Parisian officer who defiantly issued a 'no to terrorists' rallying call at the reopening of the Bataclan last year.

He was shot in the head when the terrorist - identified today as French national Karim Cheurfi, 39 - launched his attack on three police officers at around 9pm last night.

Jugelé was a proud defender of gay rights who protested against Russia’s ban on 'homosexual propaganda' ahead of the 2014 Olympics.

He was also in the final weeks of his job at the time of his death, having had farewell drinks with colleagues with a view to joining the Judicial Police, according to the New York Times.

Jugelé had reportedly been to Greece to help police officers deal with the flood of migrants who had crossed the Aegean Sea in search of shelter within the European Union.

He is believed to have been in a civil union but did not have children with his partner. The slain officer was also due to celebrate his 38th birthday next month.

Mikaël Bucheron, president of Flag, a French association for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender police officers, paid tribute saying: 'He was a simple man who loved his job, and he was really committed to the L.G.B.T. cause.

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'He joined the association a few years ago, and he protested with us when there was the homosexual propaganda ban at the Sochi Olympic games.'  

It has also emerged that Jugelé was on duty at the reopening of the Bataclan theatre in November last year - a year on from the Paris attacks which left 130 dead - and was among the officers who responded to the atrocity at the concert hall.

As British singer Sting performed to mark the reopening of the venue, Jugelé defiantly told PEOPLE.com that he was there 'to say no to terrorists'.

The policeman added: 'I'm happy to be here. Glad the Bataclan is reopening. It's symbolic.

'We're here tonight as witnesses. Here to defend our civic values. This concert's to celebrate life. To say no to terrorists. 

'It doesn't feel strange, it feels important,' he added. 'Symbolic.' 

It has since emerged that Jugelé was on duty at the reopening of the Bataclan theatre on November last year - a year on from the Paris attacks which left 130 dead.
Jugelé

It has since emerged that Jugelé (pictured left and right) was on duty at the reopening of the Bataclan theatre on November last year - a year on from the Paris attacks which left 130 dead

Forensic experts examine evidence from a police van on the Champs Elysees in Paris last night

Forensic experts examine evidence from a police van on the Champs Elysees in Paris last night

Police officers secure the area after a terrorist gunman opened fire on the Champs Elysees

Police officers secure the area after a terrorist gunman opened fire on the Champs Elysees

The ISIS gunman, identified as Karim Cheurfi (pictured), who was jailed for 20 years for trying to kill officers in 2001, parked his Audi and opened fire after police stopped at a red light

The ISIS gunman, identified as Karim Cheurfi (pictured), who was jailed for 20 years for trying to kill officers in 2001, parked his Audi and opened fire after police stopped at a red light

Meanwhile Sting told the audience, including survivors, that they had to honour the dead and celebrate life.

The Bataclan has been renovated entirely since the attack.

It was the last place targeted by ISIS militants on Friday, 13 November 2015. 

The co-ordinated attacks had already struck the Stade de France and restaurants filled with people enjoying their evening.

Terror suspect Karim Cheurfi is pictured

Terror suspect Karim Cheurfi is pictured

About 1,500 people had been watching American band Eagles of Death Metal at the Bataclan when the gunmen burst in.

Cheurfi was armed with a Kalashnikov when he mowed down Jugelé and two other officers in a terror attack in Paris last night.

Jugelé died instantly with a shot to the head, while the other two were hurt before Cheurfi himself was gunned down by nearby armed police. A ricocheting bullet fired by the terrorist also wounded a female foreign tourist passing by.

ISIS has claimed responsibility for the attack and named the attacker as 'Abu Yousif al-Belgiki', which translates to 'the Belgian' in Arabic. 

It has since emerged that the homegrown fanatic, who officials confirmed was a French national despite his nickname, had also been released early from prison – where it is thought he was radicalised – having been jailed for 20 years in 2005 for trying to kill two policemen.

He was also detained in February after informants said he was 'seeking to obtain weapons to kill policemen'.

But the 39-year-old, who used the war name 'Abu Yousuf the Belgian', had to be released because anti-terror police did not have enough evidence to hold him.

At around 9pm local time last night Cheurfi parked up his silver Audi and opened fire after police stopped at a red light on the French capital's popular shopping district.

The killer was known to security services in France, according to reports emerging last night

The killer was known to security services in France, according to reports emerging last night

Xavier Jugelé was shot dead and two more injured by a gunman carrying a Kalashnikov

Xavier Jugelé was shot dead and two more injured by a gunman carrying a Kalashnikov

Dramatic footage has captured the moment French police chased and shot dead an ISIS gunman who had just murdered one of their colleagues in cold blood

Dramatic footage has captured the moment French police chased and shot dead an ISIS gunman who had just murdered one of their colleagues in cold blood

A pump action shotgun and knives were found in the Audi he was driving, which also contained his ID - confirming to detectives that he was known to security services for a number of recent offences and had been flagged as an 'extremist'.

Officers have been searching the home of the alleged shooter in east Paris and arrested three of his family members. 

A French government spokesman said the ISIS gunman began firing against police using 'a weapon of war'.

Police have now launched a desperate manhunt for a second suspect, who travelled by train to France from Belgium.

The fatal incident unfolded as presidential candidates, including National Front party leader Marine Le Pen, debated on a TV show nearby before Sunday's election.

CHAMPS-ELYSEES: THE MOST BEAUTIFUL AVENUE IN THE WORLD

The Champs-Elysees - the scene of Thursday night's terror attack - is the beating historic heart of Paris.

It has been described as the 'most beautiful avenue' in the world and is visited by millions of tourists every year. 

Tens of thousands of people daily throng the tree-lined 1.2 mile avenue that is home to luxury stores and chain stores, cafes, cinemas and high-end offices.

A tourist draw as famed as the Eiffel Tower just across the River Seine, the avenue, stretching from the Arc de Triomphe down to Concorde Square, was first laid out in 1670.

Over the decades people have gathered there to mark momentous moments in French history.   

During the French Revolution in 1789 an angry mob set off from the avenue to march on Versailles, Louis XVI's opulent retreat.

It was also the site chosen by General Charles de Gaulle to celebrate the August 25, 1944, liberation of Paris from the Germans during World War Two. 

More recently, hundreds of thousands congregated along the avenue to celebrate France's 1998 World Cup victory (sealed with a 3-0 win over Brazil) on home soil.

The Champs Elysees is famously the finish line for the world's toughest cycling race, the Tour de France. 

Thursday was not the first time violence has been visited on the avenue.

In 1986, it witnessed two attacks - the first, on February 3, seeing one death and eight injured at the Claridge shopping arcade.

A second attack on March 20 at the Point Show arcade killed two and injured 29. Both attacks were linked to Middle East terrorism.

On Bastille Day in 2002, president Jacques Chirac survived an assassination attempt by a right-wing extremist who fired off one shot from a rifle hidden in a guitar case before bystanders wrestled him to the ground.